Insomnia: Is Menopause Keeping You Awake?

If you find yourself tossing and turning in bed as you try to sleep, proper breathing may help your slumber

It’s likely as you go about your day, the last thing you ever think about is how to breathe. Breathe in, breathe out. That’s all there is to it, right?

This simple act is essential to your wellbeing and learning how to perform breathing techniques correctly can help with one of the cumbersome affects of menopauseinsomnia.

Improper breathing can come from something as common as a stressful job

Improper breathing can come from something as common as having a stressful job. Being under stress causes a shallow, chest breathing style of inhaling. If you have ever had to tell the customer you can’t deliver what your boss promised them, or had to deal any of hundreds of types of jobs that are time sensitive, or requires you to do more that it seems any one person could do, then you know what I mean. Serious stress.

And the antidote is really simple – diaphragmatic breathing. This type of  breathing exercise won’t come up very often in dinner conversation, but it’s one of the best ways for reducing anxiety and fatigue from a day’s stressful activities. And it doesn’t cost a dime. It’s a simple process. 

Just sit in a comfortable chair and utilize deep breathing. Concentrate on filling your belly with air first, followed by allowing your chest to expand. The diaphragm is a muscle under your lungs and above your stomach. Extending your diaphragm downwards towards your tummy is how you stretch it out and as a result, fill your lungs to their capacity.

Concentrate on filling your belly with air first, followed by allowing your chest to expand

It’s a good idea to be in a quiet place when doing this. Images of nature, hobbies or relaxing music will chase the anxieties away and replace them with hope, joy and fulfillment.

If you’re on your lunch break, be sure to keep an eye on the clock because the next thing you know is you’ve dozed off and the boss is looking for you. No stress there! Performing this type of slow, deep breathing at night will make it easier to both fall sleep and sleep will be deeper, resulting in feeling rested and alert to tackle your new day.

If you are feeling tense at night before going to sleep, try tensing up the muscles in your feet and release, followed by tensing your calves and release, next thighs and release. Keep going up through the abs, chest, shoulders, back and even your face. Remember to keep using the diaphragmatic breathing technique the whole time.

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